Condo – 366 Union Ave Framingham, MA 01702 is now new to the market!

Enjoy the treetop views from this updated, uncommon & spacious condominium. This home is filled with comfort and character including period details like elaborate moulding and millwork, elegant light fixtures and glass doorknobs. Two spacious bedrooms plus a beautiful & bright sun room. French doors lead to master bedroom with double closets. Ceiling fans throughout, eat-in-kitchen with large pantry & inviting breakfast bar. Hardwood flooring and many large replacement windows . Central location close to major routes 90/9/126/30, Framingham State University, many medical offices & hospital. Convenient to library, restaurants, shops, parks, playgrounds, schools, houses of worship and much more! Monthly condo fee includes: heat, hot water, landscaping, master insurance, snow removal, maintenance, xtra storage and water/sewer expenses.

This is a Low-Rise style home and features 5 total rooms, 1 full bath, 2 bedrooms, and is currently available for $174,897.

For complete details click here.

Updating Your Bedroom

Is your bedroom in need of a slight makeover?  Surprisingly enough, many people don’t spend too much time thinking about how their bedroom looks.  How many times have you been on a tour of a friend’s new home, and the tour stops short of their sleeping area?  If you don’t want to fall into the trap of feeling like your bedroom isn’t a “show off” room, then take a few steps to jazz it up a bit.

By paying a little attention to a few areas in your bedroom, you can leave that door open with no shame.

New Bedding – Depending on your sleeping preferences, your bed may well be the biggest piece of furniture in your home.  Coincidentally, your bedding may also be one of the largest decorations in your home.  Do you like your bedding?  Does it match your home and personality well?  If it leaves you wanting, then consider outfitting your bed with a new bedding set.  With this one improvement, the entire mood of your bedroom can change.  If you can manage to find curtains or drapes that complement your bedding, it will tie your bedroom together in a big way.

Floors – Bedrooms may have the least amount of floorspace visible, but that doesn’t mean that they should be neglected.  Consider buying a decorative rug for your room.  Or, if you’re feeling adventurous, consider installing a new carpet or flooring.  The sky is the limit here, and any change made is likely to be an improvement.

Laundry – Piles of unfolded or dirty laundry can be an eyesore. Even a visible laundry hamper is enough to be a distraction.  Consider outfitting your closet door with a hanging laundry basket, or instituting a “no dirty laundry in the bedroom” rule for yourself.

Lighting – If you rely solely on overhead lighting in your bedroom, then consider buying a lamp or two.  Lamps will serve to highlight your furniture, as well as create a more relaxing environment.

Make Your Own Toilet Cleaner

Scrubbing the bathroom is not a fun job. Add smelly, expensive chemicals to the mix and cleaning the commode can be a real drag. You can get your toilet sparkly clean in no time and with regular household items.

Here is a recipe for homemade toilet cleaner:


1 cup borax
1/4 cup vinegar or lemon juice

1. Combine the borax and vinegar to make a paste.

2. Apply it to the inside of the toilet bowl, let sit for 1 to 2 hours.

3. Scrub the bowl.

What is your favorite natural house cleaner?

Keeping Your Kids Safe at Home

If you are moving into a new home with young children, it is very important to have a safety strategy in place. Moving into a larger house with a young family can always be a real challenge. When taking the needed precautions early on, you can be assured your children will be safe. This is especially true when you’re moving into a brand-new home from an apartment.

1. Establish a secure cabinet for cleaning supplies: When determining the storage area for your cleaning supplies, be certain to choose a location that cannot be accessed by a child. Keeping all of your detergent and household chemicals in one area that is difficult to reach, and protected with a child safety lock, will keep your children away from these harmful materials. Establishing this designated area early on will allow you to isolate harmful chemicals that are brought into your home immediately.

2. Cover your electrical outlets: Placing plastic socket covers in each of your unused electrical outlets is the best way to protect your child. If you have kids that are just starting to crawl and explore, there is a good chance they will try to put their fingers into an unprotected electrical socket. Socket covers are a simple precaution to take to help protect your child against injuries caused by electrical shock.

3. Check your smoke alarms often and install a carbon monoxide detector: When you are moving into a new home, it’s always best to inspect or replace the smoke alarms and install a carbon monoxide detector right away. Installing these devices will not only benefit your children, but will benefit your family as a whole. Be certain that your early warning devices are well maintained and in good working order at all times. Early detection of carbon monoxide build up, or fire is the best way to prevent injury to your family members in this type of emergency situation.

4. Set up barriers: Make sure that you are always locking your doors, blocking off stairways and securing windows. This can prevent falls by children who are curiously exploring their new environment. Installing baby gates will prevent your child from accessing areas that could be potentially dangerous, or leaving an area that is child safe. Placing child safety locks on windows and your doors will  help to prevent accidents while making your home more secure at the same time.

How to Bargain for Anything

Who doesn’t love a bargain? You can negotiate a deal for just about anything. Here is how to try your hand at bargain hunting at flea markets, yard sales, junk stores, antique malls, and thrift stores.

Some helpful tips on how to haggle:

Dress the part. If you are looking for a deal don’t flaunt your designer handbag and shoes. You want the seller to believe you when you say you’re only willing or able to pay less.

Be friendly. A smile and kind hello can go a long way when asking for a discount.

Ask for the discount. You can’t get what you don’t ask for.

Make a fair offer. If you offer too little you can insult the seller and they will be less willing to offer you a deal. Start your offer at a little more than half the asking price and expect to meet somewhere in the middle.

Inspect the merchandise. If the item has a flaw nicely point it out to the seller.

Make a group offer. Gather a group of items and offer one price for all of them together. This benefits the seller and they are typically more willing to make a deal.

Pay in cash. Always buy in cash, sellers love cash (who doesn’t). You may even want to take the money out of your wallet to show the seller you are serious.


What You Need to Know: Lead Paint

Did you know that approximately three-quarters of the housing in the United States built before 1978 contain lead-based paint? That is about 64 million homes.  Lead paint can pose little risk, but it can also cause serious risks when it isn’t properly maintained and managed.

There are approximately 1.7 million children that have blood-lead levels above safe limits. Lead poisoning can cause permanent brain damage and damage other organs. It can also cause abnormal fetal development for pregnant women. Lead comes into bodies by breathing or swallowing lead dust, soil or paint chips.

The Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction ACT of 1992 directs the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to ensure people receive information needed to protect themselves from lead-based paint hazards.

In 2008, EPA issued the Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule. It requires that firms performing renovation, repair, and painting projects that disturb lead-based paint in pre-1978 homes, child care facilities and schools be certified by EPA. If you are a homeowner performing renovation, repair, or painting work in your own home, EPA’s RRP rule does not cover your project. For information on the RRP click here.

For home buyers federal regulations require that home sellers provide lead disclosures to home buyers who are purchasing a home built before 1978. Buyers have 10 days to conduct a lead-based paint inspection or risk assessment at their own expense. The regulation does not require any testing or removal of lead-based paint by sellers.


Smoke Detector Safety

Smoke detectors save lives. Many people may be lulled into a false sense of security thinking they have smoke detectors in their home. Smoke detectors that are not installed or maintained properly are not safe. Here are a few tips on what you need to know about buying, installing, and maintaining your smoke detectors:

What should I buy?

The National Burn Institute recommends only buying smoke alarms tested by Underwriters Laboratories (UL). You will also want to make sure the smoke detector has a battery backup. Smoke detectors that don’t work in a power outage are no good. Consider buying a combination smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector, they may be more expensive, but well worth the money.

There are two main types of smoke alarms, which are categorized by the type of smoke detection sensor used in the alarm. They are ionization and photoelectric.

Ionization smoke detectors

Ionization detectors respond quickly to flaming fires with smaller combustion particles. They contain a chamber with two plates that generate a small, continuous electric current. When smoke enters the ionization chamber, the smoke particles disrupt the current flow, which triggers the alarm.

Photoelectric smoke detectors

Photoelectric detectors respond more quickly to smoldering fires. They use a light beam and light receptor. When smoke is present between the light and receptor, the photocell sensor triggers the alarm.

Combination smoke detectors

The best smoke alarms can sense both types of fires (flaming and smoldering). For the highest degree of safety and preparedness, there are combination smoke alarms also that combine ionization and photoelectric detectors into one unit, called dual sensor smoke alarms.

Check with your local fire department to see what kind of detector they recommend.

Installation and Maintenance

Smoke detectors should be installed on each floor, outside of every bedroom and sleeping area and near any air vents. Detectors should also be installed high on walls or on ceilings because smoke rises. Avoid installing detectors near windows, doors or where there are openings where smoke can escape.

Check with your local fire department for specific regulations on the placement of detectors.

Smoke detectors have a lifespan of about seven to 10 years, and it’s important to replace old detectors according to the model’s recommendations. Test your alarm’s batteries monthly and remember to replace all batteries at least once a year. Clean and vacuum the grill of your detector to get rid of dust and debris. Other maintenance includes a monthly testing of the alarm and cleaning with a vacuum hose about once every month.

Who Are Today’s Home Buyers?

Knowing who the home buyers are when selling your home can help you create a successful marketing plan. It is important to create a marketing plan around the potential pool of buyers for your home. Each year the National Association of Realtors conducts a survey to find out who buyers are and what they are looking for. Here is just some of what they found:

Are you surprised by any of these statistics? If so, what surprised you?

Is Your Agent Showcasing Your Home Online?

Did you know that 87% of potential home buyers start their home search online? More and more of us are shopping online today and it is important that your home stand out from the crowd of homes for sale. When interviewing potential real estate professionals ask about how they will advertise your home online.

Here are a few questions to ask about online advertising…

1. Do you have a website?

2. Do you feature properties for sale on your website?

3. Can potential buyers inquire about homes for sale on your website?

4. Do you leverage social media to advertise homes for sale? If so, what social media do you use?

5.  Do you use video marketing?

6. Do you have a mobile website?

7. Do you have school and community information available online?

8. How often is the information on your website updated?

9. Is your online advertising professionally designed?

10. Will potential buyers be able to schedule a showing online?